Hebrew Language #12 Hebrew Literature #9 Medieval scholarship

Medieval scholarship To return to the period of the Geōnīm. While the schools of Babylonia were flourishing as the religious head of Judaism, the West, and especially Spain under Moorish rule, was becoming the home of Jewish scholarship. On the breaking up of the schools many of the fugitives fled to the West and helped […]

Hebrew Language #11 Hebrew Literature #8 The Qaraites or Karaites

A look at Karaite Judaism (“Followers of the Bible”) which had its base in the Crimea in the Middle Ages, and looking at the influence of its teachers and writings on Christianity and Islam.

Hebrew Language #10 Hebrew Literature #7 The Geōnīm

The Geōnīm The order of the Amoraim, which ended with the close of the Talmud (C.E. 500), was succeeded by that of the Sabōrāīm, who merely continued and explained the work of their predecessors, and these again were followed by the Geōnīm, the heads of the schools of Sura and Pumbeditha in Babylonia. The office […]

Hebrew Language #9 Hebrew Literature #6 Hebrew Liturgy

When looking at Hebrew Liturgy we look at the religious phenomenon of the Jehudiem or Jews where their liturgy represents a communal response to and participation in the sacred through activities reflecting praise, thanksgiving, remembrance, supplication, or repentance, giving themselves to their Bore or Divine Creator, the Elohim Hashem יהוה (YHWH) Jehovah in the hope […]

Hebrew Language #8 Hebrew Literature #5 Talmud and Masorah

In the previous chapter we said that traditional teaching was not confined to halakhah, or the ordinances regulating religious observances. We saw that it was the duty of the teachers to show the connexion of practical rules with the written Law. And as such Midrash, exposition, from darash arised to “investigate” a scriptural passage and […]

Hebrew Language #7 Hebrew Literature #4 Mishnah and Midrash

Last episode we ended by the 2nd century and spoke about a period which followed the later canonical books, not only was translation, and therefore exegesis, cultivated, by Elders and their pupils that form the starting-point of the next series, the Tannāīm, who occupy the first two centuries of this common era. Mishnah By this […]

Hebrew Language #6 Hebrew Literature #3 Halakhah

Halakhah We must now return to the 2nd century. During the period which followed the later canonical books, not only was translation, and therefore exegesis, cultivated, but even more the amplification of the Law. According to Jewish teaching Halakhah. (e.g. Abhoth i. 1) Moses received on Mount Sinai not only the written Law as set […]

Hebrew Language #5 Hebrew Literature #2 Torah, Apocryphal literature and Targum

Apocryphal Hebrew literature It is not to be supposed that all the contents of the Old Testament were immediately accepted as sacred, or that they were ever all regarded as being on the same level. The Torah, the Law delivered to Moses, held among the Apocryphal literature.Jews of the 4th century B.C.E. as it holds […]

Hebrew Language #4 Hebrew Literature #1 Old Testament

Hebrew Literature by Arthur Ernest Cowley Old Testament-Scriptures. Properly speaking, “Hebrew Literature” denotes all works written in the Hebrew language. In catalogues and bibliographies, however, the expression is now generally used, conveniently if incorrectly, as synonymous with Jewish literature, including all works written by Jews in Hebrew characters, whether the language be Aramaic, Arabic or […]

Hebrew Language #3 Among Christian scholars

Looking at the Hebraists in the Greek and Latin Church up to the 19th cnetury.

Hebrew Language #2 The name “Hebrew” and Speech of Canaan

Arthur Ernest Cowley looking at Hebrew speech and writing.

Hebrew Language #1: Teaching “Sticky” Hebrew

by Dr. Paul Overland | Ashland Theological Seminary There is a huge problem in the way that biblical Hebrew is currently taught: it doesn’t stick. Polytetrafluoroethylene, or PTFE, is better known by its household name “Teflon.” It’s the coating on cookware that prevents food from sticking to the pan, and it’s the perfect term to […]

Biblical Archaeology Review, Spring 2022

The Spring 2022 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review brings together a fascinating array of articles that provide both fresh outlooks on old questions and insightful reflection on the history behind the season’s holidays. “Piece by Piece: Exploring the Origins of the Philistines” examines the background to one of biblical archaeology’s most debated origins questions and […]

Is een fundamentalistische kijk op de bijbel, de enige mogelijke kijk?

Originally posted on malakhahavah:
Naar Burggraeve Inleiding Het woord fundamentalisme is afgeleid van een werk uit het begin van de twintigste eeuw “The fundamentals” geredigeerd door R.A. Torry, die de vijf basisdoctrines van het christelijke geloof naar voren wilde brengen. Deze zijn volgens dit werk: De goddelijkheid van de Heer Jezus Christus (Joh 1,1; Joh…

Excavating ‘Auja el-Foqa

It is good to learn that the archaeologists at the different sites in Israel had no real problems with the present CoViD-19 pandemic. At ‘Auja el-Foqa it might be due to the timing of their dig season last year (February 9–20, 2020), that the researchers were not affected by the virus. Directed by David Ben-Shlomo […]

Charles Price Jones better known as C. P. Jones

In our last episode looking at 5 influential Afro-American preachers we look at the man born in Floyd County, Georgia who became a missionary Baptist preacher in Jackson, Mississippi, where he met Charles Harrison Mason in 1895 with whom C.P. Jones and two other preachers held a faith healing revival in Jackson.
Like many other leaders of the emerging Holiness Movement, C.P. did not intend to start another denomination. He urged unity under the slogan, “Denominationalism is slavery”. But the difference was too great and Mt. Helm Baptist chose a new name. Jones and C. H. Mason began calling their work the Church of God in Christ about 1899. By 1907, however, Mason was promoting speaking in tongues and Jones’ group chose the name Church of Christ (Holiness).

Richard Allen

In our fifth chapter on African clergymen, we look at the founder and first bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, a major American denomination, Richard Allen.

Rev. Alexander Crummell

In our fourth chapter looking at Afro-American preachers, we look at the American scholar and Episcopalian minister Alexander Crummell, founder of the American Negro Academy (1897), the first major learned society for African Americans.

Rev. Henry Highland Garnet

In our third chapter looking at Afro-American preachers, we look at the leading African American abolitionist and clergyman Henry Highland Garnet (1815-1882)

George Liele

In our series looking at the influence of Afro-Americans in Church we look at George Liele and Andrew Bryan (of mixed race) who was stimulated by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (S.P.G.) to become a religious leader.