History and Archaeology sciences looked at #4 Nature of archaeological work #2

Archaeology ἀρχαιολογία (lit. ‘discourse on things ancient’) coming from the Greek archaia (“ancient things”), and logos (“theory or science”) has us looking at the ancient things, material remains of man’s past. Its Latin equivalent, antiquitates, yielded the English word ‘antiquities’ which long served to define a branch of historical inquiry that concerned itself with materials […]

Archaeology and the Bible

In every instance where the findings of archaeology pertain to the Biblical record, the archaeological evidence confirms, sometimes in detailed fashion, the historical accuracy of Scripture. In those instances where the archaeological findings seem to be at variance with the Bible, the discrepancy lies with the archaeological evidence, i.e., improper interpretation, lack of evidence, etc. […]

Archaeology and the Bible researcher 4/4

Bibliography General Good general introductions to the aims and methods of archaeology are: Leonard Woolley, Digging Up the Past (1930); Sir Mortimer Wheeler, Archaeology from the Earth (1954); Grahame Clark, Archaeology and Society, 3rd rev. ed. (1957). History For the history of archaeology and its relation to the development of anthropology: W. F. Albright, The […]

Archaeology and the Bible researcher 2/4

Renaissance From early as the 15th century researchers stood up to dig into the soil to mean study the material remains of man’s past. The Renaissance Humanists looked back upon the glories of Greece and Rome. Popes, cardinals, and noblemen in Italy in the 16th century began to collect antiquities and to sponsor excavations to […]

Archaeology and the Bible researcher 1/4

Knowing what happened in previous times For the Bible researcher it is important to know what happened in the time when the Books of the Bible were written. He is interested in the logos (the word but also the “theory or science”) from the ancient times. As such Achaia (from the Greek meaning “ancient things) […]